Mosquito finds blood vessel (by edyong209)


just a lone star tick vegetarian conspiracy

Some days, I really admire the wildness of nature. 

"Odd as it seems, researchers say that bites from the voracious lone star tick are making some people allergic to red meat—even if they’ve never had a problem eating it before.

The Lone Star Tick

  • Scientific name: Amblyomma americanum
  • Common name: Lone star, due to the white spot on females’ back
  • Habitat: Wooded areas with thick underbrush
  • Natural hosts: White-tailed deer, wild turkey
  • How to avoid: Steer clear of wooded areas; wear pants tucked into socks; use tick repellent on skin and clothing; check gear, pets and body thoroughly
  • How to remove: Use tweezers, gripping as close to the skin as possible

Sources: CDC; Susan Little, Oklahoma State U.

The allergic reactions range from vomiting and abdominal cramps to hives to anaphylaxis, which can lead to breathing difficulties and sometimes even death.” 

wall street journal

lonestarburger


unregulated use of stem cells in plastic surgery yields bone growth in your eyeball! vanity is a killer, ladies. scientific american

unregulated use of stem cells in plastic surgery yields bone growth in your eyeball! vanity is a killer, ladies. scientific american


I can’t decide if I want to vomit or bid on this lot of vintage stereoscopes featuring images of skin diseases. LINK 

I can’t decide if I want to vomit or bid on this lot of vintage stereoscopes featuring images of skin diseases. LINK 


Chinese researchers have genetically modified a herd of cattle to produce something like human breast milk.
"The genetically modified cow milk is 80 percent the same as human breast milk," said Li Ning, a professor and the project’s director as well as lead researcher.
Details from Reuters
Can this help babies whose mom’s can’t produce boob juice? Or adoptive parents? How do cows feel about being used so hard by humans that they can’t even control the milk they make? O, humans. 

Chinese researchers have genetically modified a herd of cattle to produce something like human breast milk.

"The genetically modified cow milk is 80 percent the same as human breast milk," said Li Ning, a professor and the project’s director as well as lead researcher.

Details from Reuters

Can this help babies whose mom’s can’t produce boob juice? Or adoptive parents? How do cows feel about being used so hard by humans that they can’t even control the milk they make? O, humans. 


 
From National Geographic
"Known as yartsa gunbu—or “summer grass winter worm”—by Chinese consumers, the nutty-tasting fungus is highly valued for its purported medicinal benefits, for instance, as a treatment for cancer and aging and as a libido booster. Far away in the booming cities of Beijing and Shanghai, demand for the fungus has soared.
"Medically, it seems to deliver," according to Daniel Winkler, a fungus researcher and head of Eco-Montane Consulting in Seattle, Washington.
"Even the whole thing that it’s an aphrodisiac—yes, it might really help."
Some Chinese grind up the fungus and sell it as a powder, and others use it whole as a garnish—and therefore a display of wealth.
"When you want to impress your business partner, you stuff some kind of fowl with it to show that money doesn’t really matter to you, because you just stuffed your goose with $100 worth of mushrooms," Winkler said.
In Tibet (see map) and other Himalaya regions of Nepal and Bhutan, yak herders who harvest the fungus are getting rich from fungus sales.
By one account, the value of caterpillar fungus shot up 900 percent between 1997 and 2008, said Winkler, who has studied the phenomenon.
Nomadic yak herders now ride motorcycles, own apartments in the city, send their kids to schools, and pay someone else to do their village chores, he said.”
The fungus is parasitic—it grows from caterpillar larva. 
So is this fungus vegan? What is your opinion of the longevity of markets fueled by parasitic fungi? Would you woo a business partner with a meal based around this? So many questions…

 

From National Geographic

"Known as yartsa gunbu—or “summer grass winter worm”—by Chinese consumers, the nutty-tasting fungus is highly valued for its purported medicinal benefits, for instance, as a treatment for cancer and aging and as a libido booster. Far away in the booming cities of Beijing and Shanghai, demand for the fungus has soared.

"Medically, it seems to deliver," according to Daniel Winkler, a fungus researcher and head of Eco-Montane Consulting in Seattle, Washington.

"Even the whole thing that it’s an aphrodisiac—yes, it might really help."

Some Chinese grind up the fungus and sell it as a powder, and others use it whole as a garnish—and therefore a display of wealth.

"When you want to impress your business partner, you stuff some kind of fowl with it to show that money doesn’t really matter to you, because you just stuffed your goose with $100 worth of mushrooms," Winkler said.

In Tibet (see map) and other Himalaya regions of Nepal and Bhutan, yak herders who harvest the fungus are getting rich from fungus sales.

By one account, the value of caterpillar fungus shot up 900 percent between 1997 and 2008, said Winkler, who has studied the phenomenon.

Nomadic yak herders now ride motorcycles, own apartments in the city, send their kids to schools, and pay someone else to do their village chores, he said.”

The fungus is parasitic—it grows from caterpillar larva. 

So is this fungus vegan? What is your opinion of the longevity of markets fueled by parasitic fungi? Would you woo a business partner with a meal based around this? So many questions…